Tag Archives: Red-throated Pipit

2017 Year in Review. Part 2. Other Visitors.

2017 Year in Review. Part 2. Other Visitors.

The discovery of the Asian Emerald Cuckoo Chrysococcyx maculatus at Sentosa by Tuck Loong and Esther Ong on 23 December had to be one of the birding highlights of the year. Another was the sighting of a female Narcissus Flycatcher Ficedula narcissina that stopped over for 3 days at Dairy Farm NP on 28 November by Veronica Foo and Marcel Finlay. Two sightings of the vagrant White-throated Needletails Hirundapus caudacutus over the Henderson Wave on 19 and 31 Oct by Keita Sin and one over Jelutong Tower on 25 Oct by Francis Yap ( Cover photo). The cuckoo and flycatcher were only our second records for these species, while the needletails were our second, third and fourth records.

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Asian Emerald Cuckoo feeding on Tussock Moth caterpillars at Sentosa was                      only our second record.

Other rare visitors include the Asian House Martins Delichon dasypus, seen thrice, 11 March at Kranji Marshes by Martin Kennewell, 19 October at Henderson Wave by Keita Sin and 24 November over Jelutong Tower by Francis Yap. Two Yellow-browed Warblers Phylloscopus inornatus, one at the Bukit Timah Hill summit on 18 January by Francis Yap and the other at Sentosa on 24 November by Lim Kim Chuah. A Siberian Thrush Geokichla sibirica was photographed by Khong Yew at Dairy Farm on 25 November and a Himalayan Cuckoo Cuculus saturatus on 3 January at Pulau Ubin’s Butterfly Hill by Keita Sin. A ‘summer visitor’, the Austral Horsfield’s Bronze Cuckoo Chrysococcyx basalis duly arrived on 27 May at Seletar end when Francis Yap went to look for them.

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Siberian Thrush from Dairy Farm. Photo: Dean Tan

A good number of rare and endangered flycatchers were sighted during the year. The globally threatened Brown-chested Jungle Flycatcher Cyornis brunneatus was recorded at Jurong Island and even Sungei Buloh WR and its usual haunt Bidadari between 30 September and 7 November. The non-breeding Brown-streaked Flycatchers Muscicapa williamsoni came over between August 13-26 and were spotted at Pasir Ris Park, Jelutong Tower and Portsdown Road.

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Brown-streaked Flycatcher, a non-breeding visitor comes over usually in July and August. Photo: Francis Yap.

Laurence Eu gave us an early arriving Green-backed Flycatcher Ficedula elisae when he photographed one at Dempsey Hill on 7 September, 10 days ahead of the previous extreme date. There were five more sightings of this flycatcher all at the Central Catchment Forest up to 6 April. Low Choon How had a new late departure date for the Japanese Paradise Flycatcher Terpsiphone atrocaudata on 3 April at Simei. Other sightings of this flycatcher was at Belayer Creek on 24 October by Laurence Eu and a female bird at Bidadari on 12 and 18 November. Rounding up was the Zappey’s Flycatcher Cyanoptila cumatilis, a recent split from the Blue and White. A first-winter bird was photographed by Khong Yew at Dairy Farm NP on 21 November, with Dave Bakewell providing the identification.

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A first winter male Zappey’s Flycatcher from Dairy Farm NP. Photo: Khong Yew.

Other notable visitors for the year were the Black-capped Kingfishers Halcyon pileata, a photographers’ favourite, recorded at Kranji Marshes, Marina Barrage, Neo Tiew Lane 3 and West Coast Park between 20 October and 21 December; and Grey Nightjars Caprimulgus jotaka on 3 November at Satay by the Bay (Christina See), and one at Bukit Batok on 2 December by Lena Chow. Both were new for the sites. They were also recorded at Bidadari, Chinese Gardens, Rifle Range Link, One-north and AMK Park.

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A low roosting Grey Nightjar at the Chinese Gardens by Looi-Ang Soh Hoon. The species was seen at six other places. 

A dead Hooded Pitta Pitta sordida found at Toa Payoh on 20 November was the first for the season. Over at Seletar end, Goh Cheng Teng reported the Red-throated Pipit Anthus cervinus on 25 November. The confiding Lanceolated Warblers Locustella lanceolata were present at Seletar end on 10 March and Tuas South on 29 Oct as per entries in ebirds by Martin Kennewell and James Lambo respectively.

Complied from the monthly Bird Reports for 2017 by Alan OwYong, edited by Tan Gim Cheong. Reference: Lim Kim Seng, The Avifauna of Singapore. Nature Society (Singapore) 2009. Many thanks to Alan OwYong, Dean Tan, Francis Yap, Khong Yew and Looi-Ang Soh Hoon for the use of their photos. 

 

 

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A Morning Birding at Bulim Grasslands.

By Doreen Ang.
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Birding at the Bulim Grasslands with Peng Ah Huay, Ian and Freda Rickwood. Photo: Michael Toh.
Large open grasslands are a premium in Singapore, especially those that are left wild and untouched. They are refuge for many of our grassland species like the Zitting Cisticolas and Paddyfield Pipits. Often during the raining season they are waterlogged, creating a haven for bitterns, crakes and snipes. One such grassland is by Bulim Avenue where both our resident Painted Snipes and the migratory Common and Swinhoe’s snipes have been seen.
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First winter Red-throated Pipit turned out to be our bird of the day. Photo: Michael Toh.
So on Sun, 25.3.2018, Ian & Freda Rickword, Peng Ah Huay, Tan Sock Ling, Michael Toh and I decided to venture to Bulim grasslands to do some sniping. We spent slightly more than 2 hours in the morning.  The grounds were wet as it had rained the night before.  We saw about 6-7 Red-wattled Lapwings, 1 Common Sandpiper, some Intermediate Egrets and many Pipits.  But zilch snipes! What a let down!
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Intermediate Egret coming in to land. Photo: Michael Toh.
In one particular flock, there were about 13 pipits on the ground.  One seen through the bins looked a bit darker and ‘fatter’.  I cannot confirm if Michael’s photo was taken from this flock but his photo does show a Red-throated Pipit (a first winter as Kim Keang and you indicated). At least this sighting save our morning birding.
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Good to see the Red-wattled Lapwings back foraging at the grasslands. Photo: Michael Toh.
We don’t know how long before the whole area will be developed. Already a bus depot has taken a good piece of land next to the PIE. Several buildings are under construction, parts of the grasslands are fenced off and other parts are cleared with a concrete road running through it. Best is to enjoy it while it is there, before such habitats become just a memory.
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No Black Kite, our resident Brahminy will do. Photo: Michael Toh.
Many thanks to Michael Toh for the use of his photos.