Tag Archives: Narcissus Flycatcher

2017 Year in Review. Part 2. Other Visitors.

2017 Year in Review. Part 2. Other Visitors.

The discovery of the Asian Emerald Cuckoo Chrysococcyx maculatus at Sentosa by Tuck Loong and Esther Ong on 23 December had to be one of the birding highlights of the year. Another was the sighting of a female Narcissus Flycatcher Ficedula narcissina that stopped over for 3 days at Dairy Farm NP on 28 November by Veronica Foo and Marcel Finlay. Two sightings of the vagrant White-throated Needletails Hirundapus caudacutus over the Henderson Wave on 19 and 31 Oct by Keita Sin and one over Jelutong Tower on 25 Oct by Francis Yap ( Cover photo). The cuckoo and flycatcher were only our second records for these species, while the needletails were our second, third and fourth records.

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Asian Emerald Cuckoo feeding on Tussock Moth caterpillars at Sentosa was                      only our second record.

Other rare visitors include the Asian House Martins Delichon dasypus, seen thrice, 11 March at Kranji Marshes by Martin Kennewell, 19 October at Henderson Wave by Keita Sin and 24 November over Jelutong Tower by Francis Yap. Two Yellow-browed Warblers Phylloscopus inornatus, one at the Bukit Timah Hill summit on 18 January by Francis Yap and the other at Sentosa on 24 November by Lim Kim Chuah. A Siberian Thrush Geokichla sibirica was photographed by Khong Yew at Dairy Farm on 25 November and a Himalayan Cuckoo Cuculus saturatus on 3 January at Pulau Ubin’s Butterfly Hill by Keita Sin. A ‘summer visitor’, the Austral Horsfield’s Bronze Cuckoo Chrysococcyx basalis duly arrived on 27 May at Seletar end when Francis Yap went to look for them.

Dean Tan

Siberian Thrush from Dairy Farm. Photo: Dean Tan

A good number of rare and endangered flycatchers were sighted during the year. The globally threatened Brown-chested Jungle Flycatcher Cyornis brunneatus was recorded at Jurong Island and even Sungei Buloh WR and its usual haunt Bidadari between 30 September and 7 November. The non-breeding Brown-streaked Flycatchers Muscicapa williamsoni came over between August 13-26 and were spotted at Pasir Ris Park, Jelutong Tower and Portsdown Road.

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Brown-streaked Flycatcher, a non-breeding visitor comes over usually in July and August. Photo: Francis Yap.

Laurence Eu gave us an early arriving Green-backed Flycatcher Ficedula elisae when he photographed one at Dempsey Hill on 7 September, 10 days ahead of the previous extreme date. There were five more sightings of this flycatcher all at the Central Catchment Forest up to 6 April. Low Choon How had a new late departure date for the Japanese Paradise Flycatcher Terpsiphone atrocaudata on 3 April at Simei. Other sightings of this flycatcher was at Belayer Creek on 24 October by Laurence Eu and a female bird at Bidadari on 12 and 18 November. Rounding up was the Zappey’s Flycatcher Cyanoptila cumatilis, a recent split from the Blue and White. A first-winter bird was photographed by Khong Yew at Dairy Farm NP on 21 November, with Dave Bakewell providing the identification.

Zappey's Khong Yew

A first winter male Zappey’s Flycatcher from Dairy Farm NP. Photo: Khong Yew.

Other notable visitors for the year were the Black-capped Kingfishers Halcyon pileata, a photographers’ favourite, recorded at Kranji Marshes, Marina Barrage, Neo Tiew Lane 3 and West Coast Park between 20 October and 21 December; and Grey Nightjars Caprimulgus jotaka on 3 November at Satay by the Bay (Christina See), and one at Bukit Batok on 2 December by Lena Chow. Both were new for the sites. They were also recorded at Bidadari, Chinese Gardens, Rifle Range Link, One-north and AMK Park.

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A low roosting Grey Nightjar at the Chinese Gardens by Looi-Ang Soh Hoon. The species was seen at six other places. 

A dead Hooded Pitta Pitta sordida found at Toa Payoh on 20 November was the first for the season. Over at Seletar end, Goh Cheng Teng reported the Red-throated Pipit Anthus cervinus on 25 November. The confiding Lanceolated Warblers Locustella lanceolata were present at Seletar end on 10 March and Tuas South on 29 Oct as per entries in ebirds by Martin Kennewell and James Lambo respectively.

Complied from the monthly Bird Reports for 2017 by Alan OwYong, edited by Tan Gim Cheong. Reference: Lim Kim Seng, The Avifauna of Singapore. Nature Society (Singapore) 2009. Many thanks to Alan OwYong, Dean Tan, Francis Yap, Khong Yew and Looi-Ang Soh Hoon for the use of their photos. 

 

 

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Singapore Bird Report-November 2017

 

Goh Cheng Teng 2

Only our second record, the female Narcissus Flycatcher taken at Dairy Farm NP on 29th by Goh Cheng Teng showing the mottled breast and the brownish upper-tailed coverts.

The star bird of the month was the Narcissus Flycatcher, Ficedula narcissina, a female, photographed on 28th at DFNP by Marcel Finlay and Veronica Foo. It stayed over for the next 2 days long enough for some great photos to confirm its ID. This will be our second record once the Records Committee completes its review. A second record for Sentosa was a female Blue Rock Thrush, Monticola solitarius, photographed by Jan Tan at Resorts World Sentosa on 2nd.

Terence Tan 4Another first for Gardens by the Bay when this rare Northern Boobook made an overnight stop over there on 8th. Photo: Terence Tan.

Other rarities for the month include a Northern Boobook, Ninox japonica, that stopped over at Satay by the Bay (SBTB) on 8th. Terence Tan was there to capture its one day stay. A very rare passage migrant, an Asian House Martin, Delichon dasypus, was very well captured by Francis Yap with Fadzrun Adnan from the Jelutong Tower on 24th.

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A composite flight shot of the Asian House Martin, a very rare passage migrant flying over Jelutong Tower well captured by Francis Yap 

Sadly pittas continued to collide into our buildings this month starting with a first for the season Hooded Pitta, Pitta sordida on the 20th. Lee Tiah Khee found the carcass at Toa Payoh. Another was found dead on 23rd by David Tan at Raffles Institution. Mabel a resident at Novena found an injured Blue-winged Pitta Pitta moluccensis, on 22nd. It survived. But not the one that Michael Leong found at Parry Road on 23rd. Lim Kim Chuah had a dead Brown-chested Jungle Flycatcher Cyornis brunneatus, at his office on Jurong island on 7th. We can ill afford the loss of this globally threatened species. David Tan picked up a dead Black Bittern Dupetor flavicollis, after it crashed into North Vista Primary School. A Malaysian Hawk Cuckoo Hierococcyx fugax, crashed into a service apartment at Wilkie Road on 2nd (Yvonne Tan). Even our resident was not spared. A dead Changeable Hawk Eagle Nisaetus cirrhatus, was picked up at Clark Quay by Asri Hasri on 25th after it crashed into one of the high rise buildings there.

Grey NJ Christina See

Eye-level shot of the Grey Nightjar, a rare winter visitor at the Satay by the Bay by Christina See.  This is the first record for this location. 

Many of the rare winter visitors were recorded in different parts of the island during the month. The best way is to list them by species for easy reference.

  1. Dark-sided Flycatcher, Muscicapa sibirica : Kent Ridge Park on 1st by Mogany Thanagavelu, Admiralty Park on 2nd by Luke Milo Teo, PRP on 7th by Zhang Licong and Bidadari on 11th by Richard White.
  2. Grey Nightjar Caprimulgus jotaka : SBTB on 3rd by Christina See, AMK Park on 12th by Tey Boon Sim and Bidadari on 20th by Khong Yew. Most number recorded in a single month.
  3. Ferruginous Flycatcher Muscicapa ferruginea : Bidadari on 3rd by Frankie Lim and a juvenile at at Healing Gardens at SBG on 23rd by Laurence Eu. Richard White reported one at BTNR on 11th and another at RRL on 23rd.  
  4. Oriental Dwarf Kingfisher Ceyx erithaca : Lentor Ave on 6th by Katherine Yeo after colliding with a building, another at Sentosa found dead by David Tan  and one found dead at the Yong Siew Toh Conservatory of Music on 11th by Shawn Ingkiriwang (picked up by David Tan).
  5. Japanese Paradise Flycatcher Terpsiphone atrocaudata : Lower Peirce Boardwalk on 3rd by Basil Chia, a juvenile at Bidadari on 12th by Pary Sivaraman (identified by Dave Bakewell) and a third from Tuas South on 17th by Alfred Ng. 

 

Pary Sivaraman 2

A juvenile Japanese Paradise Flycatcher at Bidadari by Pary Sivaraman on 12th November. We may have overlook this plumage before. It stayed until 18th.

  1. White-shouldered Starling Sturnia sinensis : All were reported around Seletar Crescent area. Francis Yap on 19th and Alfred Chia on 22nd with three birds.
  2. Eyebrowed Thrush Turdus obscurus: 5-6 birds over Jelutong Tower on 24th by Francis Yap and another at DFNP on the same day. Goh Cheng Teng had a flock of 20 birds circling over the northern part of Changi Coastal Road. The last for the month was at RRL on 29th by Stuart Birding.
  3. Indian Cuckoo Cuculus micropterus : Bidadari on 3rd by Sam Ng and another at SBG on 25th by Gautham Krishnan.
  4. Chestnut-winged Cuckoo Clamator coromandus : Bidadari on 2nd by Looi Ang Soh Hoon, Chinese Gardens on 3rd by Ben Choo and a dead bird at Pasir Ris on 26th by Lim Kim Chuah.
  5. Von Schrenck’s Bittern Ixobrychus eurhythmus : Pulau Ubin on 4th by Yong Ding Li and Nigel Collar, and at SBTB on 5th by Kozi Ichiyama.
  6. Hodgson’s Hawk Cuckoo Hierococcyx nisicolor : Pulau Ubin on 4th (Yong Ding Li and Nigel Collar) and Pasir Ris Park on 25th by a friend of Deborah Friets.

Some of the single sightings of rare migrants reported for the month include a lugens White Wagtail Moticilla alba, at Sembawang on 6th (Fadzrun Adnan), Orange-headed Thrush Geokichla citrina, at SBG on 7th by Lim Kim Chuah, a juvenile Eastern Yellow Wagtail Motacilla tschutschensis, at Yishun on 8th by Khoo Meilin, Crow-billed Drongo, Dicrurus annectans, on 11th and a Siberian Blue Robin, Larvivora cyane, on 14th both at BTNR by Richard White, Black Drongo Dicrurus macrocercus, perched on the fence of Seletar Airport on 19th by Goh Cheng Teng, Black-capped Kingfisher Halcyon pileata at Kranji Marshes on 19th by See Wei An during a NSS Bird Group Walk and a Pallas’s Grasshopper Warbler Locustella certhiola, at Sengkang Wetlands on 21st by Francis Yap.

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Had to be the most open and clear shot of this sulker, Pallas’s Grasshopper Warbler, taken at the Sengkang Wetlands by Francis Yap.

The Eastern Crowned Warblers Phylloscopus coronatus, were still coming through. Thio Hui Bing reported one at Windsor Park on 22nd. Mugimaki Flycatcher Ficedula mugimaki (Stuart Birding) and Blyth’s Paradise Flycatcher Terpsiphone affinis, (Marcel Finlay) were still visiting Bidadari on 20th. A Red-throated Pipit Anthus cervinus, was expertly picked up by Adrian Silas Tay on 25th at the Seletar end.

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Zappey’s Flycatcher identified by the blue patch on the breast, taken at Dairy Farm NP by Khong Yew.

The rush to Dairy Farm Nature Park was sparked off by Zhang Licong’s alert of a 1st winter male Blue and White/Zappey’s Flycatcher on 24th. This was followed by a 1st winter Zappey’s Flycatcher Cyanoptila cumatilis two days later. Dave Bakewell pointed to the small blue patch on its breast. An Eye-browed Thrush Turdus obscurus, together with a rarer Siberian Thrush Geokichla sibirica, a passage migrant were seen feeding on the fig tree behind the Wallace Center on 24th and 25th respectively. Both male and female Mugimaki Flycatchers Ficedula mugimaki, and a Jambu Fruit Dove Ptilinopus jambu, (Kozi Ichiyama) were also seen feeding there on 26th. Veronica Foo had the only adult Blue and White Flycatcher Cyanoptila cyanomelana there on the 28th.

Dean Tan

The rarer Siberian Thrush making a short stop over at Dairy Farm NP. Photo by Dean Tan. 

In the air, more interesting migrants were seen passing through. Flocks of 20 Red-rumped Swallows Cecropis daurica, on 1st (Alan OwYong), a Needletail spp on 6th (Frankie Cheong), both over Henderson Wave at Telok Blangah Hill. Keita Sin reported one of the largest flock of 70 Oriental Pratincoles Glareola maldivarum, flying over Kent Ridge Park on 15th.

As for our residents, Yong Ding Li showed Nigel Collar the Mangrove Pitta Pitta megarhyncha, at Pulau Ubin on 4th. A King Quail Excalfactoria chinensis, was reported by Martin Kennewell at Kranji Marshes on 5th. He also had a Cinnamon Bittern Ixobrychus cinnamomeus, there on 12th, two very good finds for Kranji Marshes. Green Imperial Pigeons Ducula aenea,  were still foraging at Changi South, with reports from Tan Eng Boo on 21st and James Tann on 22nd. A not so common sight nowadays was a flock of hundreds of White-headed Munias Lonchura maja, seen flying at the Tuas Grasslands on 5th by Low Choon How. They used to be very common there in the 90s but most of the open grasslands have been developed.

The only shorebird of note to report is a Bar-tailed Godwit Limosa lapponica, seen flying to Chek Java on 30th by Tay Kian Guan. As for the raptors, we had an Eurasian Sparrowhawk Accipiter nisus and Amur Falcon Falco amurensis, two very rare vagrants during the last week of the month. These and other raptors will be in the full Raptor Report coming out soon.

Location abbreviations: SBG Singapore Botanic Gardens, DFNP Dairy Farm Nature Park, RRL Rifle Range Link, SBTB Satay by the Bay, AMK Ang Mo Kio and BTNR Bukit Timah Nature Reserve.

References:

Lim Kim Seng. The Avifauna of Singapore. 2009. Nature Society (Singapore).

Yong Ding Li, Lim Kim Chuah and Lee Tiah Khee. A Naturalist’s Guide to the Birds of Singapore. 2013. John Beaufoy Publishing Limited.

Craig Robson. A Field Guide to the Birds of Thailand and South East Asia. 2000.

This report is compiled by Alan OwYong and edited by Tan Gim Cheong from selected postings in various facebook birding pages, bird forums, individual reports and extracts from ebird. This compilation is not a complete list of birds recorded for the month and not all the records were verified. We wish to thank all the contributors for their records. Many thanks to Goh Cheng Teng, Terence Tan, Francis Yap, Christina See, Pary Sivaraman, Khong Yew and Dean Tan for the the use of their photos. Please notify alan.owyong@gmail.com if you find errors in these records.

Seven New Species added to the 2013 Checklist.

The following seven new species were accepted into Category A by the Records Committee in 2015. They were added to the 2013 Checklist (385) making the total of 392 species for the 2015 Checklist. Many thanks to all who sent in their records for review.

Indian Pond Heron at Bida

Indian Pond Heron at Bidadari

  1. Indian Pond Heron Ardeola grayii: Joseph Tan shot this heron at Bidadari on the 11th April 2015 and did not think too much of this heron. Six days later, Er Bong Siong shot and posted it on his facebook and identified it as a Javan Pond Heron. Francis saw the post and immediately alerted everyone that an Indian Pond Heron was at Bidadari. He and others went the next day and found it at the open grass patch. This confirms an earlier record of another summer bird seen at Senoko on 20 Mar 1994 by Lim Kim Chuah and Lim Kim Seng which now constitutes the first record for Singapore. This record had been listed in Category D for wild species where possibility of escape or release cannot be excluded. (Link1)
Eurasian Sparrowhawk Jv. by Martii Simponen

Eurasian Sparrowhawk Jv. by Martii Simponen taken at Tuas.

2. Eurasian Sparrowhawk Accipiter nisus: an immature seen and photographed at Tuas on 14 Nov 2010 by Martti Siponen. He did not know that it was an Eurasian Sparrowhawk at the time until some friends of his saw it in his collection a few years later. We had several reports of this accipiter but the evidence presented was not sufficient for confirmation. An unconfirmed report of a female at MacRitchie Reservoir on 23 Jan 2001 had been listed  in Category F for species regarded as doubtful due to possible of mis-identification.

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Oriental Darter taken at Bukit Combak

3. Oriental Darter Anhinga melanogaster: One seen at Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve on 26 June 2006 by Graham Langley. There were also two subsequent records that were accepted, from Bukit Gombak, in August 2014 from Jean-Marc Chavatte, Lee Tiah Khee and Alan Owyong, and Pulau Ubin in July 2015 from Francis Yap. These are the second and third records for Singapore.

Northern Boobook LCH

Northern Boobook at Tuas South. Photo by Low Choon How.

4. Northern Boobook Ninox japonica: a specimen in the LKC Museum mislabeled as Ninox scutulata and collected in Singapore in Nov 2000 is the first record for Singapore (Sadanandan et al 2015). There were five subsequent records in Oct 2013, Mar 2014, Nov 2014 and Nov 2015 (2 records) that are accepted as the 2nd to 6th records for Singapore. Alan Owyong, David Li and Low Choon How were the observers but it was Alison Wilson’s 23 March 2014 dead specimen’s DNA confirmation that put this difficult species on the Singapore List.

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Narcisus Flycatcher, female, taken at Bidadari. Photo by Hio John.

5. Narcissus Flycatcher Ficedula narcissina: a female reported at Bidadari Cemetery on 2 Dec 2015 by Robin Tan, Alan Ng, Hio John and See Toh Yiew Wai.(Link5)

Scarlet Breasted Flowerpecker by Jimmy Tan

Scarlet-breasted Flowerpecker taken in Panti. Photo by Jimmy Tan

6. Scarlet-breasted Flowerpecker Prionochilus thoracicus: 1 seen on Pulau Ubin by Yong Yik Shih, Ng Chay Tuan and Elizabeth Rothwell.

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Richard’s Pipit taken outside Singapore by Michelle and Peter Wong.

7. Richard’s Pipit Anthus richardi : One seen at Khatib on 19 Oct 2015 by Angus Lamont.

Reference: Lim Kim Seng. The Avifauna of Singapore 2009. Craig Robson. A Field Guide to the Birds of Thailand and South-East Asia. Asia Books Ltd 2000. Text copied from Lim Kim Seng’s Records Committee Report 2015.  Many thanks to Martii Siponen, Low Choon How, Hoi John, Jimmy Tan and Michelle and Peter Wong for the use of their photos.

 

Singapore Bird Report-December 2015

 

Narcissus FC Robin Tan

Narcissus Flycatcher Female, a national first from Bidadari. Photo: Robin Tan.

Our soon to be developed former Muslim Cemetery at Bidadari was the place to be in for the Singapore birder in December. It seemed that both migratory birds, especially flycatchers and the residents decided to pay their final homage to the place! We got a national first there on the 2nd Dec when Robin Tan, Hio John and Alan Ng photographed a female Narcissus Flycatcher (Ficedula narcissina) (Link). Lawrence Cher photographed a blue-hued flycatcher which was initially identified as a Blue-and-white flycatcher. Upon closer inspection, it turned out to be a male of the very rare Chinese Blue Flycatcher, (Cyornis glaucicomans), which would be our second national record if accepted by the RC. On the 23rd December, Lim Kim Keang and Low Choon How found and photographed a Savanna Nightjar, (Caprimulgus affinis) and two Red-wattled Lapwings, (Vanellus indicus) at Bidadari. Both were new additions to Bidadari’s rapidly increasing checklist, bringing its total species count to 157 species. A Grey Nightjar (Caprimulgus indicus) was seen wintering there on 9th Dec by Vincent Ng. It stayed long enough for Noah Strycker to see it on the 27th Dec during his Global Big Year stop here. (Link). The Hooded Pitta (Pitta sordida), returned on the 9th Dec (Alan Ng). See Toh Yew Wai photographed a rare Green-backed Flycatcher, Ficedula elisae, on the 20th December while Leslie Fung added the rare Japanese Paradise Flycatcher(Terpsiphone atrocaudata)on the 22ndDec.  Danny Lau and Tan Kok Hui reported a confiding Malayan Night Heron (Gorsachius melanolophus) on the 26th. Another wetland species, the Cinnamon Bittern (Ixobrychus cinnamomeus) was recorded here on 23rd Dec by Lawrence Cher. One new national record, the second confirmed record of another species, two new locality records and the presence of several rare flycatchers and winter visitors shows just how important Bidadari is as a stopover site for migratory landbirds in the country.

Chinese Blue FC LCher

Chinese Blue Flycatcher, our second record also from Bidadari. Photo: Lawence Cher. .  

The other exciting find of the month was the elusive Barred Eagle Owl (Bubo sumatranus), which was discovered at Bukit Timah Nature Reserve by Kennie Pan on the 8th Dec. We have had sporadic reports of sightings of this large owl at CCNR, Pulau Ubin and BTNR in the past years. But this time it stayed long enough for a few photographers to get our excellent daytime shots of this owl here. A day before the year ends, Lim Kim Seng was surprised to find not one but three female Cotton Pygmy Goose (Nettapus coromandelianus) swimming at one end of the MacRitchie Reservoir. Noting how much this species has declined since the 1980s, it was great to see these ducks making a comeback. Dirk Tomsa reported a Large Hawk- Cuckoo (Hierococcyx sparveriodes) at Coney Island on the 13th Dec. This could be the first record of this rare cuckoo on the island. On the same day Lim Kim Chuah reported a total of three White Wagtails (Motacilla alba) at the Kranji Sanctuary Golf Course. Not to be outdone, Vincent Lao photographed another three White Wagtails at the Bishan Canal on 20th. One of them turned out to be an individual of the distinctive subspecies lugens. Except for a lone record of a black-backed spring adult reported in March 1993 (Wells 2007), this possibly constitute the second record for Singapore and the region. M. a. lugens is also known as a vagrant to the Philippines. We have to thank Alfred Chia for noticing this and getting expert confirmation quickly. (Link ).

Blue Rock Thrush

Blue Rock Thrush at the Pinnacle @ Duxton. Photo: Con Foley.

A Blue Rock Thrush (Monticola solitarius), this time a neat-looking male bird was seen again at the Pinnacle @ Duxton on 20th Dec (Vinchel Budihardjo and later by Lawrence Cher). This obliging individual stayed long enough for many others to see it and proved to be a lifer for many. A resident of Toa Payoh photographed a Malayan Night Heron, Gorsachius melanolophus, wandering around the open field there on the 18th Dec (reported by David Tan). This migratory heron is usually a very shy bird, like the one reported at Tuas on the 18th Dec by Francis Yap, so this individual may have been disorientated after a crash. Millie Cher photographed the confiding Black-browed Reed Warbler (Acrocephalus bistrigiceps) at Jurong Eco Gardens on the 26th, a new addition for the gardens.

Red-billed Starling Seng Alvin

Red-billed Starling at Tampines Eco Green Canal. Photo: Seng Alvin

Seng Alvin posted a photo of a starling foraging with a group of mynas at the canal at Tampines Eco Green. It was identified as a Red-billed Starling Sturnus sericeus. The most southernly part of its wintering range is in northern Vietnam although there has been odd records in peninsular Thailand. The Records Committee will soon be evaluating its status. One of the few notable records of resident forest species for the month was a male Blue-winged Leafbird, Chloropsis cochinchinensis, photographed by Chan Kum Chun at Sentosa. Our only previous records of this species on Sentosa were in 1990 and 2007 at the remnant forest patches at Mount Serapong. Good to know that it was still around.

From the numerous reports, it appears that there was an influx of the winter- visiting Watercock, Gallicrex cinerea. The first was a dead bird found at Mountbatten on the 7th Dec and reported by Robert Zhao, followed by one on the 9th by Sandra Chia and another at Turut Track on the 13th Dec by Lim Kim Chuah. A Black Bittern (Ixobrychus flavicollis) was a first for Jurong Eco Garden thanks to Andrew Tan’s record on 20th Dec. As many as eight Long-toed Stints (Calidris subminuta) were seen at the Kranji Golf Course on the 19th Dec by Lim Kim Keang. The stints were first reported by Lim Kim Seng on 8th Dec when he reported seeing one stint. Due to the rapid disappearance of freshwater wetlands, the records of Long-toed Stint had declined over the years. Other interesting waterbirds include a Grey-tailed Tattler, Tringa brevipes was observed and photographed by Ann Ang at SBWR on the 26th  Dec.

Jedon's Baza at TEG Seng Alvin

Jerdon’s Baza at Tampines Eco Green. Photo: Seng Alvin.

Over at Punggol Barat, Lawrence Cher photographed six Black-tailed Godwits (Limosa limosa) flying over. Punggol Barat continues to deliver its open country specialties in spite of the disturbance caused by clearance works. Three White-shouldered Starlings (Sturnus sinensis) were photographed here by See Toh Yew Wai on 25th Dec and a Red-rumped Swallow Hirundo daurica, was photographed in flight over Seletar North Link by KC Ling on the 27th Dec. Solomon Anthony was the first to record Black Kite, Milvus migrans, this season when he photographed one at SBWR on 18th Dec. Another individual was photographed by Lawrence Cher at Punggol Barat on the 29th Dec.  Other interesting raptor records for the month include a Common Buzzard (Buteo buteo) at Tuas on the 8thDec by Muller Lugman, Jerdon’s Baza, Aviceda jerdoni, at Tampines Eco Green on the 19th Dec by Seng Alvin and a juvenile Rufous-bellied Eagle, (Lophotriorchis kienerii) over at Dairy Farm on the 22nd Dec by Lim Kim Keang. The year ended with a Greater Spotted Eagle (Clanga clanga), over at Pasir Ris Camp at Lorong Halus. Serin Subaraj got his lifer during his BMT there on the 31st December.

Abbreviations

BTNR = Bukit Timah Nature Reserve             RC = Records Committee.

CCNR = Central Catchment Nature Reserve

SBWR = Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve

References: The Avifauna of Singapore. Lim Kim Seng, 2009. A Field Guide to the Birds of Thailand and South-east Asia. Craig Robson. 2000. A Naturalist Guide to the Birds of Singapore. Yong Ding Li, Lim Kim Chuah and Lee Tiah Khee. 2013.

This report is compiled by Alan OwYong from the postings in various facebook birding pages, bird forums and individual reports. Some were not verified. We wish to thank all the  contributors for their records. Many thanks to RobinTan, Con Foley, Lawrence Cher and Seng Alvin for the use of your excellent photos and Yong Ding Li for editing this report.

Narcissus Flycatcher, a New Flycatcher to Singapore.

 

Contributed by Alan Ng, Robin Tan and Hio John. 24 Dec 2015.

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Browner upper parts and tinged upper tail coverts.

On the morning of 2nd of December 2015, Alan Ng went down to Bidadari Cemetery with his pals Robin Tan and Hio John to photograph the Mugimaki Flycatcher, Ficedula mugimaki, last seen the day before at a ficus tree at the Maria Stella High School end of the cemetery. The first winter male Mugimaki was there and so was another flycatcher flying around at the lower branches. It looked very much like an Asian Brown Flycatcher, Muscicapa dauurica, But it had some rufous rump and the black bill did not fit the Asian Brown which they know so well. Good thing that they all took some shots and showed Robin’s photos to See Toh Yew Wai. See Toh knew straight away that this was a different flycatcher and asked for help. Ding Li and Albert Low then identified it as a female Narcissus Flycatcher Ficedula narcissina, based on Hio John’s photo showing the rufous tinged wing coverts and rump. Albert Low got his global lifer when he rushed down after work. So did See Toh, Lim Kim Keang, Con Foley and others who went down that evening. By then the flycatcher was foraging much higher up.

Narcissus FC 2 John Hio

Whitish underparts with variable mottling on the breast.

Those of us who turned up the next morning were disappointed. Only the Mugimaki Flycatcher and a suspect Green-backed Flycatcher were seen. Another brownish flycatcher with a very similar looking upperparts was seen for a few seconds. Unfortunately Jimmy Lee and Alan OwYong could not see its wings and tail to identified it.  And that was the last of any trace of this flycatcher.

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The Narcissus Flycatcher was split into this nominate species and the Green-backed elisae ( King et al 1975). So far we have been getting the Green-backed Flycatcher confirmed and added into our checklist. The Records Committee has agreed and accepted this sighting as the Narcissus Flycatcher under Category A. It has been added to the 2015 Official Check List. This is the first record of a Narcissus Flycatcher in Singapore. Congratulations.

The Narcissus Flycatcher is native to Sakhalin through Japan, Korea and mainland China. Highly migratory it winters in South East Asia including the Philippines and Borneo ( Birdlife International 2012)

Reference: The Avifauna of Singapore. Lim Kim Seng. 2009. A field Guide to The Birds of Thailand and South-East Asia. Craig Robson. Asia Book Co. Ltd 2000. Photos: Hio John.