Tag Archives: Green-backed Flycatcher

Singapore Bird Report-December 2015

 

Narcissus FC Robin Tan

Narcissus Flycatcher Female, a national first from Bidadari. Photo: Robin Tan.

Our soon to be developed former Muslim Cemetery at Bidadari was the place to be in for the Singapore birder in December. It seemed that both migratory birds, especially flycatchers and the residents decided to pay their final homage to the place! We got a national first there on the 2nd Dec when Robin Tan, Hio John and Alan Ng photographed a female Narcissus Flycatcher (Ficedula narcissina) (Link). Lawrence Cher photographed a blue-hued flycatcher which was initially identified as a Blue-and-white flycatcher. Upon closer inspection, it turned out to be a male of the very rare Chinese Blue Flycatcher, (Cyornis glaucicomans), which would be our second national record if accepted by the RC. On the 23rd December, Lim Kim Keang and Low Choon How found and photographed a Savanna Nightjar, (Caprimulgus affinis) and two Red-wattled Lapwings, (Vanellus indicus) at Bidadari. Both were new additions to Bidadari’s rapidly increasing checklist, bringing its total species count to 157 species. A Grey Nightjar (Caprimulgus indicus) was seen wintering there on 9th Dec by Vincent Ng. It stayed long enough for Noah Strycker to see it on the 27th Dec during his Global Big Year stop here. (Link). The Hooded Pitta (Pitta sordida), returned on the 9th Dec (Alan Ng). See Toh Yew Wai photographed a rare Green-backed Flycatcher, Ficedula elisae, on the 20th December while Leslie Fung added the rare Japanese Paradise Flycatcher(Terpsiphone atrocaudata)on the 22ndDec.  Danny Lau and Tan Kok Hui reported a confiding Malayan Night Heron (Gorsachius melanolophus) on the 26th. Another wetland species, the Cinnamon Bittern (Ixobrychus cinnamomeus) was recorded here on 23rd Dec by Lawrence Cher. One new national record, the second confirmed record of another species, two new locality records and the presence of several rare flycatchers and winter visitors shows just how important Bidadari is as a stopover site for migratory landbirds in the country.

Chinese Blue FC LCher

Chinese Blue Flycatcher, our second record also from Bidadari. Photo: Lawence Cher. .  

The other exciting find of the month was the elusive Barred Eagle Owl (Bubo sumatranus), which was discovered at Bukit Timah Nature Reserve by Kennie Pan on the 8th Dec. We have had sporadic reports of sightings of this large owl at CCNR, Pulau Ubin and BTNR in the past years. But this time it stayed long enough for a few photographers to get our excellent daytime shots of this owl here. A day before the year ends, Lim Kim Seng was surprised to find not one but three female Cotton Pygmy Goose (Nettapus coromandelianus) swimming at one end of the MacRitchie Reservoir. Noting how much this species has declined since the 1980s, it was great to see these ducks making a comeback. Dirk Tomsa reported a Large Hawk- Cuckoo (Hierococcyx sparveriodes) at Coney Island on the 13th Dec. This could be the first record of this rare cuckoo on the island. On the same day Lim Kim Chuah reported a total of three White Wagtails (Motacilla alba) at the Kranji Sanctuary Golf Course. Not to be outdone, Vincent Lao photographed another three White Wagtails at the Bishan Canal on 20th. One of them turned out to be an individual of the distinctive subspecies lugens. Except for a lone record of a black-backed spring adult reported in March 1993 (Wells 2007), this possibly constitute the second record for Singapore and the region. M. a. lugens is also known as a vagrant to the Philippines. We have to thank Alfred Chia for noticing this and getting expert confirmation quickly. (Link ).

Blue Rock Thrush

Blue Rock Thrush at the Pinnacle @ Duxton. Photo: Con Foley.

A Blue Rock Thrush (Monticola solitarius), this time a neat-looking male bird was seen again at the Pinnacle @ Duxton on 20th Dec (Vinchel Budihardjo and later by Lawrence Cher). This obliging individual stayed long enough for many others to see it and proved to be a lifer for many. A resident of Toa Payoh photographed a Malayan Night Heron, Gorsachius melanolophus, wandering around the open field there on the 18th Dec (reported by David Tan). This migratory heron is usually a very shy bird, like the one reported at Tuas on the 18th Dec by Francis Yap, so this individual may have been disorientated after a crash. Millie Cher photographed the confiding Black-browed Reed Warbler (Acrocephalus bistrigiceps) at Jurong Eco Gardens on the 26th, a new addition for the gardens.

Red-billed Starling Seng Alvin

Red-billed Starling at Tampines Eco Green Canal. Photo: Seng Alvin

Seng Alvin posted a photo of a starling foraging with a group of mynas at the canal at Tampines Eco Green. It was identified as a Red-billed Starling Sturnus sericeus. The most southernly part of its wintering range is in northern Vietnam although there has been odd records in peninsular Thailand. The Records Committee will soon be evaluating its status. One of the few notable records of resident forest species for the month was a male Blue-winged Leafbird, Chloropsis cochinchinensis, photographed by Chan Kum Chun at Sentosa. Our only previous records of this species on Sentosa were in 1990 and 2007 at the remnant forest patches at Mount Serapong. Good to know that it was still around.

From the numerous reports, it appears that there was an influx of the winter- visiting Watercock, Gallicrex cinerea. The first was a dead bird found at Mountbatten on the 7th Dec and reported by Robert Zhao, followed by one on the 9th by Sandra Chia and another at Turut Track on the 13th Dec by Lim Kim Chuah. A Black Bittern (Ixobrychus flavicollis) was a first for Jurong Eco Garden thanks to Andrew Tan’s record on 20th Dec. As many as eight Long-toed Stints (Calidris subminuta) were seen at the Kranji Golf Course on the 19th Dec by Lim Kim Keang. The stints were first reported by Lim Kim Seng on 8th Dec when he reported seeing one stint. Due to the rapid disappearance of freshwater wetlands, the records of Long-toed Stint had declined over the years. Other interesting waterbirds include a Grey-tailed Tattler, Tringa brevipes was observed and photographed by Ann Ang at SBWR on the 26th  Dec.

Jedon's Baza at TEG Seng Alvin

Jerdon’s Baza at Tampines Eco Green. Photo: Seng Alvin.

Over at Punggol Barat, Lawrence Cher photographed six Black-tailed Godwits (Limosa limosa) flying over. Punggol Barat continues to deliver its open country specialties in spite of the disturbance caused by clearance works. Three White-shouldered Starlings (Sturnus sinensis) were photographed here by See Toh Yew Wai on 25th Dec and a Red-rumped Swallow Hirundo daurica, was photographed in flight over Seletar North Link by KC Ling on the 27th Dec. Solomon Anthony was the first to record Black Kite, Milvus migrans, this season when he photographed one at SBWR on 18th Dec. Another individual was photographed by Lawrence Cher at Punggol Barat on the 29th Dec.  Other interesting raptor records for the month include a Common Buzzard (Buteo buteo) at Tuas on the 8thDec by Muller Lugman, Jerdon’s Baza, Aviceda jerdoni, at Tampines Eco Green on the 19th Dec by Seng Alvin and a juvenile Rufous-bellied Eagle, (Lophotriorchis kienerii) over at Dairy Farm on the 22nd Dec by Lim Kim Keang. The year ended with a Greater Spotted Eagle (Clanga clanga), over at Pasir Ris Camp at Lorong Halus. Serin Subaraj got his lifer during his BMT there on the 31st December.

Abbreviations

BTNR = Bukit Timah Nature Reserve             RC = Records Committee.

CCNR = Central Catchment Nature Reserve

SBWR = Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve

References: The Avifauna of Singapore. Lim Kim Seng, 2009. A Field Guide to the Birds of Thailand and South-east Asia. Craig Robson. 2000. A Naturalist Guide to the Birds of Singapore. Yong Ding Li, Lim Kim Chuah and Lee Tiah Khee. 2013.

This report is compiled by Alan OwYong from the postings in various facebook birding pages, bird forums and individual reports. Some were not verified. We wish to thank all the  contributors for their records. Many thanks to RobinTan, Con Foley, Lawrence Cher and Seng Alvin for the use of your excellent photos and Yong Ding Li for editing this report.

Singapore Bird Report – April 2015

Indian Pond Heron photographed on 11 April by Joseph Tan at Bidadari Cemetery. Potentially a new addition to the Singapore Check List.

Indian Pond Heron photographed on 11 April by Joseph Tan at Bidadari Cemetery. Potentially a new addition to the Singapore Checklist.

We may have a potential new addition to Singapore Check List when Joseph Tan B.K. photographed an Indian Pond Heron, Ardeola grayii at Bidadari on 11th if it is accepted by the Records Committee. He did not process it until he saw a post of the Indian Pond Heron a week later. Er Bong Siong shot the same Pond Heron on the 17th and posted it as a Javan Pond Heron. Francis Yap saw the photo and noticed the dark brown mantle and scapulars, diagnostic features of an Indian Pond Heron. Unfortunately the Indian Pond Heron took off the next day much to the disappointment of many birders. Our first record was a summer bird on 20th March 1994 at Senoko but was placed under Category D for wild birds where possibility of escapee or release cannot be ruled out. Before this record the most southern range for this Pond Heron was in Ipoh, Perak. Another potential addition to our Checklist was the third sighting of the Pied Cuckoo, Clamator jacobinus at Lorong Halus on 4th by Anthony Nik after Mark Oei’s at Halus Bridge and Lim Kim Chuah’s record at the Grebe pond last month.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Asian Paradise Flycatcher Male making a one day stop over at Bidadari cemetery on 29th April. Alan OwYong.

We had been getting several rain storms in the late evenings and nights during the latter part of the month. As a result many of the migrants returning back north were forced to make a quick stop over here. We were pleasantly surprised that the migrants chose Bidadari Cemetery as their rest stop just as they did in the Autumn.  The list included the Hooded Pitta, Pitta sordida on 9th ( Frankie Lim), Chinese Pond Heron, Ardeola bacchus, a breeding Tiger Shrike, Lanius trigrinus,  and a male Yellow-rumped Flycatcher, Ficedula zanthopygia,  all on the 18th reported by Tan Kok Hui, a Dark-sided Flycatcher, Muscicapa sibirica,  on 25th by Zacc HD and the star of Bidadari, a white morphed male Asian Paradise Flycatcher, Terpsiphone paradisi, on 29th (Paul Lee and Vincent Ng). Those who turned up that afternoon went away happy after getting this much sought after flycatcher on their sensors.

Asian Paradise Flycatcher at Tuas South by Chan Boon Hong

Asian Paradise Flycatcher at Tuas South by Chan Boon Hong

Returning migrants were also reported elsewhere. An incei Asian Paradise Flycatcher, Terpsiphone paradisi male was picked up at Tuas South on 9th by Chan Boon Hong on his way to work. Hooded Pitta, Pitta sordid, on 18th by Kweechang Ling, Crow-billed Drongo, Dicrurus annectans, and Black Bittern, Ixobrychus flavicollis, on 12th at the Gardens by the Bay, ( Kelvin Yong and  David Awcock respectively), Green-backed Flycatcher, Ficedula elisae on 24th at Rifle Range Link by Lim Kim Seng, Black-capped Kingfisher on 24th at P. Ubin by Scarlet Lee, another Dark-sided Flycatcher, Muscicapa sibirica, on 25th at Sime Forest by See Toh Yew Wai and a Grey Nightjar, Caprimulgus jotaka, on 28th at Tampines Eco Green by Ang Teck Leng. The Green-backed Flycatcher sighting may be our new extreme date, the last being 9th April.

Non-breeding visitors reported were a Crested Serpent Eagle, Spilornis cheela, at P.Ubin on 4th by Amanda Tay  and a male and female Jambu Fruit Dove, Ptilinopus jambu, at the MacRitchie Boardwalk on 22nd by Laurence Eu.

April is the month when most of our resident species were busy bringing up new broods. We have several nesting records all over the island. Lucy Davis put out a nesting box in her garden at Wilton Close a few years back and now a pair of Oriental Magpie Robin, Copsychus saularis, finally decided to use it on the 5th. Lee Van Hein reported a pair of Greater Racket-tailed Drongos, Dicrurus paradiseus, nesting high up in the Albizia at Hindhede Nature Park.  He also photographed Oriental White-Eyes,  Zosterops palpebrosus,  nesting at Jurong Eco Gardens on 15th. A pair of Common Flamebacks Dinopium javanense, were digging a nest hole at Pasir Ris Park on 18th (Lim Kim Keang) and Blue-throated Bee-eaters, Merops viridis, nesting at Jalan Kayu on 18th by Heather Gwach.

Sunda Scops Owl at Hindhede Nature Park by Frankie Lim

Sunda Scops Owl at Hindhede Nature Park by Frankie Lim

Interesting and notable resident species sightings include a Sunda Scops Owl, Otus lempiji, ( left ) at Hindhede NP during the day on 2nd by Frankie Lim, two grey morphed Pacific Reef Heron, Egretta sacra, at Sungei Buloh New Extension feeding during low tide on 3rd by Alan OwYong.

 

Black-crested Bulbul at Bukit Timah summit. Phototgraphed by Raghav.

Black-crested Bulbul at Bukit Timah summit. Photo by Raghav.

An introduced Black-Crested Bulbul, Pycnonotus melanicterus, at Bukit Timah NR on 4th by Raghav and Subha, Abbott’s Babbler, Malacocincia abbotti, at West Coast Park on 16th by Francis Yap, a lone House Swift, Apus nipalensis,  hawking for insects over at Labrador NP on 20th by Alan OwYong, Brown Hawk Owls, Ninox scutulata, off Mandai Road (L. Neo) and West Coast Park by Lim Kim Keang, five active and calling Mangrove Pittas, Pitta megarhyncha, and an Asian Drongo Cuckoo, Suniculus lugubris, at Pulau Ubin on 24th by David Tan, a rare Lesser Green Leafbird, Chloropsis cyanopogon, MacRitchie Forest on 26th by Lim Kim Seng and a Ruddy Kingfisher, Halcyon coromanda, at Pasir Ris Park on 28th by Lim Kim Chuah.  Good record for the Abbott’s Babbler returning to this part of the island. Both the Asian Drongo Cuckoo and Ruddy Kingfisher are also winter visitor and passage migrant respectively to our island. The House Swift is highlighted as their population have crashed in recent years.

Those who went out on the 2nd NSS Bird Group Pelagic Survey to the Straits of Singapore on 26th were rewarded with a rare sighting of a juvenile Lesser Frigatebird, Fregata ariel, and an adult Parasitic Jaeger, Stercorarius parasiticus. Other seabirds seen were Swinhoe’s Storm Petrels, Oceanodroma monorhis, and Lesser Crested, Thalasseus bengalensis, and Swift Terns, Thalasseus bergii.

Juvenile Lesser Frigatebird at Singapore Strait

Juvenile Lesser Frigatebird at Singapore Strait

An adult Parasitic Jaeger at Singapore Strait flying away at a distance.

An adult Parasitic Jaeger at Singapore Strait flying away at a distance.

Reference: The Avifauna of Singappore. Lim Kim Seng 2009. A field Guide to the Birds of Thailand and South-East Asia. Craig Robson. Asia Books Co. Ltd 2000. Edited by Francis Yap. The above records are taken from the various bird FB groups. pages, reports and forums.  Many thanks for your postings. Thanks to Joseph Tan, Francis Yap, Frankie Lim, Chan Boon Hong, Raghav and Alan OwYong for the use of your photos.

Singapore Bird Report – November 2014

Yellow-eared Spiderhunter FY

A very rare resident Yellow-eared Spiderhunter at Dillenia Hut by Francis Yap.

The Central Catchment Forest was the center of attention this November with the appearance of  four mega rare resident species. The Yellow-eared Spiderhunter was spotted (FY) feeding on a flowering Eugenia tree near the Dillenia Hut on 20th. It was last seen 8 years ago at Rifle Range Link (YDL). Two days later two rare flowerpeckers, the Thick-billed and the Yellow-vented followed the spiderhunter out to check on a flowers on 22nd (DL,LJS,TKH). It was good to know that they are still around in our central forests besides Bukit Timah NR. Even the rarely seen Lesser Green Leafbird was attracted by the flowers. It came out on the 23rd together with the larger Greater Green Leafbird giving us (LKS, LKK, AOY) a few brief views.

Thick-billed FP See Toh

Another rare resident the Thick-billed Flowerpecker at Dillenia Hut by See Toh Yew Wai.

Elsewhere there were many notable sightings include a Gull video swimming at the main pond at SBWR on 7th (LeC). Unfortunately it was too far away for a proper id. An irruption of over 200 Ashy or Cinereous Bulbul was seen over at Chek Java on 4th (LKK,WT). We are still looking for answers as to where they come from. They were later reported all over the island throughout the month. The first Common Kestrel was seen over Tuas South on 1st (LC) with more sightings in the following days. A Greater Spotted Eagle over at Tuas on 13th (AOY) was the third sighting of the year. The Japonensis Peregrine Falcon returned to the CDB on14th (LEL) after a year of absence.  A very rare non-breeding visitor the Streaked Bulbul was seen feeding with the Ashy Bulbuls at Canterbury Road on 13th (LKK). Two days later another two were photographed at Tuas South Ave16 bush (FY) and another on 23rd at the same area (LJS). The rare Japanese Paradise Flycatcher passed through at Bida on 28th (FY,STYW). A surprise Green Broadbill was seen feeding at East Coast Park on 27th (STYW) and 28th. This former resident is now extinct. The Records Committee will have to deliberate on its status.  And right up to the last day, an Oriental Darter was seen at the Ketam Quarry, Ubin (AL). Will this find help to determine the status of one seen in August at the Seng Chew Quarry?

Green-backed FC Alan Ng

Rare migrant Green-backed Flycatcher, male, at Bidadari by Alan Ng.

Bidadari remains the top spot for incoming migrants while we had some surprises from Tuas South.

First the migrants at Bidadari. A juvenile Oriental Cuckoo seen on the first two days of the month (AL) could very well be the same cuckoo reported last month. A passing Black-backed Kingfisher was a good find on 1st (BQ) followed by a late Dark-sided Flycatcher on the 2nd (AR) and 20th (KLH). An early Hodgson’s Hawk Cuckoo was photographed on the 8th (AR). This was followed by another Hodgson’s at SBWR on the 15th (LKK).  The Hodgson’s Hawk Cuckoos are normally seen towards the end of November. Female Mugimaki Flycatchers made their land fall on the 12th (FY) followed by a few males later on. They were still around at the end of the month. The long awaited Hooded Pitta appeared on 24th (LKK). An Eye-browed Thrush on 27th (LKS) was the first for the season while a male Green-backed Flycatcher was seen on the same day (AN). A skittish uncommon Malayan Night Heron was reported on 28th (STWY), rounding off with a Eastern Crown Warbler on 30th (KLH)

Streaked Bulbul See Toh

A very rare non-breeding visitor Streaked Bulbul at Tuas South by See Toh Yew Wai.

Over the skies at Tuas South we had a few surprises. A Brown Hawk Owl was photographed flying over on 1st (LCH). Could this be the northern migrant race of Boobook that is not on our Checklist. A Eurasian Curlew on 7th (TGC), a Black-capped Kingfisher on 9th (STYW) and flocks of Oriental Pratincoles were still coming in with 12 on 13th (AOY) and 73 counted on 15th (LCH). Three Little Ringed Plovers flying pass on 16th (STYW). A single Black Drongo at Tuas Avenue 9 on 20th (RA). The bush in the middle of the open field at Tuas South seems to be the preferred land fall for the passerine migrants with at least two Malayan Night Herons seen on 21st (FY) and 28th (LCH). A juvenile Hodgson’s Hawk Cuckoo on 22nd (LKS, AOY). STYW photographed his Streak Bulbul here on the 23rd after being alerted by LJS.

Reports from other parts of the island include a warbler was mist-netted at the Ecolink on 8th by NParks team (CYF, DT) and appeared to be the Sakhalin Leaf Warbler. Blood samples are being analysed.  Flocks of migrating Fork-tailed or Pacific Swifts were seen all over the island,  40 over Kent Ridge Park feeding on flying termites on 4th (AOY), 50+ thermaling over Telok Blangah Hill on the 9th (AOY). A juvenile Rosy Starling was seen together with the Glossy Starlings at Kent Ridge Park on 10th (FY).  It stayed for a few days. A first winter male Blue and White Flycatcher was reported at Tampines Eco Park on 11th (JA) and later a female on 21st (SA). The White Wagtails of both Leucopsis and Ocularis races were seen at Seletar Dam on 14th (GP). A Green-backed Flycatcher was photographed at Bishan Park on 23rd related by YDL.  The Reed Warblers are back with the Black-browed  seen at Bishan Park on 23rd (JL) and the Pallas’s Grasshopper Warbler at Sengkang Wetlands on 27th (AC). A first of the season Black Bittern was seen at Bishan Park on 27th (LKS).

Pomarine Jaeger FY

Probable rare Pomarine Jaeger at the Straits of Singapore by Francis Yap.

The only pelagic trip to the Straits of Singapore on the 23rd was organised by STYW and the lucky day trippers photographed a probable rare Pomarine Jaeger and a Common Tern besides the usual Swift and Lesser Crested Terns.

The casualties continued to mount as expected. A Lanceolated Warbler crashed into a window at Sengkang Square on 9th, recovered after resting, but was eaten by a House Crow much to DT dismay. A Yellow-rumped Flycatcher, first winter male found dead at Jervios Hill on 14th.  A Black Bittern found dead at Jurong West on 16th and a dead Cinnamon Bittern, probably a migrant at NTU Building the next day. The globally threatened Brown-chested Flycatcher was also a casualty crashing into a flat at Woodlands Ave 8 on the 26th (KK). Meanwhile over at Jurong Island, LKC nursed back to health a Blue-winged Pitta that crashed into his office on 22nd but was not able to save a Hooded Pitta that was found dead on 24th.

A comprehensive Raptor Report for November will be published by Tan Gim Cheong at a coming date.

Reference: The Avifauna of Singapore Lim Kim Seng 2009.  Edited by Francis Yap. Bird crashed records are from David Tan. All other records were taken from postings in the various facebook, bird forums and individual facebook pages belonging to Francis Yap (FY), Seng Alvin (SA), Rey Aguila (RA), See Toh Yew Wai (STYW), Lim Kim Seng (LKS), Lim Kim Keang (LKK), Wellington Tan (WT), Lau Jiasheng (LJS), Lawrence Cher (LC), Lena Chow (LeC), Ben Quek (BQ), Low Choon How (LCH), Aldwin Recinto  (AR), Tan Gim Cheong (TGC), Chung Yi Fei (CYF), David Tan (DT), Danny Lau (DL), Tan Kok Hui (TKH), Janice Ang (JA), Koh Lian Heng (KLH),  George Persanis (GP), Jimmy Lee (JL), Kennneth Kee (KK) and Alan OwYong. Many thanks for your records..