Tag Archives: Streaked Bulbul

Records Committee Report 2015-Rarities.

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Short-toed Snake Eagle at Changi Grasslands, one of the 11 rarities accepted. Photo: Alan OwYong.

Besides deciding on new additions, the Records Committee also review records of rare species that are already in the Check List. This review is important to monitor the abundance or otherwise of such species. The Records Committee wishes to thank everyone who send in their records of rare species for review.

Rarities

The following rarities were accepted during the period:

Lesser Frigatebird Fregata ariel:  1 reported at the Singapore Straits on 28 Oct 2012 by Francis Yap et al.

Short-toed Snake Eagle Circaetus gallicus: 1 reported at Changi on 23 Dec 2012 by Francis Yap, Yong Yik Shih, Alan Owyong and Lim Kim Keang.

Besra Accipiter virgatus: 1 reported at Changi on 17 Nov 2012 by Lau Jiasheng and another at the same site on 7 Dec 2012 by TK Lee, Yong Yik Shih and Lim Kim Seng.

Greater Spotted Eagle Clanga clanga: 1 juvenile photographed and seen at Changi by Lim Kim Chuah, Lim Kim Seng and Lee Tiah Khee was our first record of the “fulvescens” form.

Slaty-legged Crake Rallina eurizonoides: 1 reported on Jurong Island on 21 Nov 2015 by Lim Kim Chuah.

Grey-headed Lapwing Vanellus cinereus: 1 seen at Singapore Botanic Gardens on 16 Nov 2015 by Richard White.

Parasitic Jaeger Stercorarius parasiticus: 3 reported at the Singapore Straits on 20 Nov 2011 by Horst Flotow, Francis Yap, Lee Tiah Khee, Doreen Ang, Alfred Chia, Lim Kim Keang and Lim Kim Seng, and 3 at the same site on 23 Oct 2012 by Francis Yap et al.

Long-tailed Jaeger Stercorarius longicaudus: 1 reported at the Singapore Straits on 13 May 2012 by Francis Yap and other observers.

Streaked Bulbul Ixos malaccensis: 4-6 reported at Bukit Timah on 18 Jul 2015 by Francis Yap.

Asian House Martin Delichon dasypus: 1 seen at Nassim Hill on 17 Nov 2015 by Richard White.

Yellow-eared Spiderhunter Arachnothera chrysogenys: 1 reported at the Central Catchment Nature Reserve on 20 Nov 2014 by Francis Yap.

The following submissions on rarities were not accepted due to lack of conclusive evidence:

Asian House Martin Delichon dasypus: 1 seen at Bukit Timah on 18 Dec 2012.

Dusky Warbler Phylloscopus fuscatus: 1 reported at Sengkang Wetlands on 22 Jan 2012.

Chinese Blue Flycatcher Cyornis glaucicomans: 1 reported at Bukit Timah on 18 Dec 2012.

Plain Sunbird Anthreptes simplex: 1 reported at Bukit Timah on 18 Dec 2012.

Compiled by Lim Kim Seng on behalf of the Records Committee.

Singapore Bird Report July 2015

Even though most of the sightings for July were non-breeding visitors and residents, some of the rare and hard to find residents decided to show up. Topping the list was a family of the most sought after King Quails, Colurnix chinensis, at Punggol Barat grasslands. Alsten Ng first saw them early in the month. Er Bong Siong photographed a male a few days later on the 9th. A total of seven were counted and they gave many of us with first time photo records of this species in Singapore. Mick Price was driving along the Tampines Expressway near the Halus exit at 6pm on 31st when he saw a small dark raptor with a white throat. He reckoned that it was a Bat Hawk, Macheiramphus alcinus,  a very rare forest resident.  On the same day Robert Teo reported the sighting of the Barred Eagle Owl, Bubo sumatranus, at Pulau Ubin. This owl don’t seem to stay put at one place for long. Staying at Ubin, Francis Yap returned with a photo of a flying Black Hornbill, Anthracoceros malayanus, on 25th. This individual had been seen in Ubin for some months by the NParks staff. The previous three records from the mainland were listed in Category E and treated as escapees.  The Oriental Darter Anhinga melanogaster, seemed to have made Pekan Quarry home. Over on the Changi Sailing Club, David Li posted a photo of the rare Green Imperial Pigeons, Ducula aenea, on 9th. Previous sightings were at Loyang but mostly in Pulau Ubin and Tekong.

Black Hornbill at Pulau Ubin. Photo by See Toh Yew Wai

Black Hornbill at Pulau Ubin. Photo by See Toh Yew Wai

Other notable residents reported were a pair of Chestnut-winged Babblers, Stachyris erythroptera,  at Rifle Range Link by Lim Kim Keang, the Blue-eared Kingfishers, Alcedo meninting, at JEG on 18th by Lee Van Hien and another at Pekan Quarry on 31st by Francis Yap.

Sunda Scops Owl by John ArifinOur resident owls put on a great showing this month. It started off with sightings of the Sunda Scops Owls, Otus lempiji,  at CCNR by Dean Tan on the first day. Then Richard White spotted a pair at the Palm Valley at the Singapore Botanic Gardens on 17th. This pair soon became the darling of our local photographers. The pair of Buffy Fish Owls, Ketupa ketupu,  was feeling very at home at the rain forest patch there. A pair of Brown Hawk Owls, Ninox scutulata, was reported by Anthony Nik at Venus Loop on 3rd. This had been their roost for quite a while. (Sunda Scops Owl left at Botanic Gardens by John Arifin )

 

Juvenile Streaked Bulbul at Pulau Ubin

Juvenile Streaked Bulbul at Pulau Ubin.Francis Yap.

A pair of Blue-winged Pittas, Pitta moluccensis, was heard dueting at P. Ubin on 3rd by Francis Yap. This is outside the extreme dates for this species which is still classified as a winter visitor to Singapore.  With more observations we may yet find them breeding here. The widespread Ospreys Pandion haliaetus, were the first non breeding species for the month. One was seen over Venus Drive on 4th by Aldwin Recinto and another over Punggol Barat on 14th by Alan OwYong. The ernesti resident race Peregrine Falcon, Falco peregrinus, returned to Church Street CBD to say hello to Lee Ee Ling.  The rare non breeding Streaked Bulbuls, Ixos malaccensis, were spotted by Francis Yap on 18th at Bukit Timah Nature Reserves. The surprise was that it was a juvenile. He followed this up with an adult and juvenile pair at P. Ubin on 25th. Could they be breeding here? There were two reports of another non breeder, the colourful Jambu Fruit Doves, Ptilinopus jambu, one on 21st at Kallang Riverside by Kanchan Guggari and another on 24th at Central Forest by Francis Yap.

Sunda Pygmy Woodpecker nesting at JEG seen in this stacked photo by Lee Van Hien

Breeding of our resident species are in full swing. “Mr JEG” Lee Van Hien found four different species at the Jurong Eco Gardens on the 18th. Chestnut-bellied Malkohas,  Phaenicophaeus  sumatranus, Ashy Tailorbirds, Orthotomus ruficeps, Sunda Pygmy Woodpeckers, Dendrocopus moluccensis, and the Malaysian Pied Fantails Rhipidura javanica.  Over at Punggol Barat, Lawrence Eu photographed a juvenile Little Tern, Sterna albifrons.

The first winter visitor arrived on 21st. Like all previous seasons it was the Barn Swallow, Hirundo rustica, to herald the start of the migrant season. This sighting was reported by Richard White from the Singapore Botanic Gardens. No shorebirds were reported compared to the sightings of Lesser Sand Plovers and Common Redshanks on the last days of July.

Reference: Avifauna of Singapore. Lim Kim Seng. 2009. A field Guide to the Birds of Thailand and South-east Asia. Craig Robson Asia Books Ltd.2000. Edited by Francis Yap. The above records are taken from the various bird FB groups. pages, reports and forums.  Many thanks for your postings. Many thanks to Francis Yap, See Toh Yew Wai, Lee Van Hien and John Arifin for the use of the photographs.

The False Curry Leaf Tree, a bird magnet.

 

 False Curry Leaf Plant ( Clausena excavata) by Angie Ng. 

Bird watchers know that a fruiting fig or a flowering tree in our parks and forests are magnets for frugivores birds like bulbuls and pigeons. Many will trek up to the summit of Bukit Timah Hill when the big ficus tree fruits to tick some of the rarer resident forest species. But now another tree the False Curry Leaf is attracting the bird watchers and photographers and some of the hard to find species at the Dairy Farm Nature Park.

The False Curry Leaf Tree (Clausena excavata)  is a small slender tree that looks like the Curry Leaf plant. Native from India to Indochina down to Malaysia, its leaf has a slight curry smell when crushed. Small green berries formed at a terminal cluster from tiny white flowers. They turn pink when ripe and has a taste of grapes. This seems to attract many of the forest species that find this berry irresistible, They in turn will help to disperse the seeds.

Some of the birds seen feeding on this plant at Dairy Farm Nature Park after alert from Doreen Ang on the Jambu Fruit Dove. Other species that were also seen feeding on the berries  were Asian Glossy Starlings, Red-crowned Barbet, Black-naped Oriole and Red-eyed Bulbuls.

Eye-browed Thrush by Lee Van Hien

Eye-browed Thrush by Lee Van Hien. An uncommon passage migrant and winter visitor first seen at Bidadari on 27th November.

 

Cinereous Bulbul by See Toh

Cinereous Bulbul by See Toh Yew Wai. A uncommon non-breeding visitor and wanderer from Peninsular Malaysia. This season we are seeing a broad dispersal across the island.

Jambu Fruit Dove at Wallace Center

Jambu Fruit Dove Juvenile by Alan OwYong. Uncommon non-breeding visitor and resident that is globally neared threatened.

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Streaked Bulbul by Alan OwYong. Non-breeding visitor most probably from the hill forests of Malaysia partly due to its nomadic behavior.

Asian Fairy Bluebird by See Toh

Asian Fairy Bluebird by See Toh Yew Wai. Common forest resident. Mid canopy feeder mostly seen at fruiting trees. Sharp one or two notes witt calls.

Straw-headed Bulbul by Lee Van Hien

Straw-headed Bulbul by Lee Van Hien. We are lucky that this globally vulnerable and nationally threatened species is doing well in our parks and forest when they are poached to extinction in their range.

Reference; A Naturalist’s Guide to the Birds of Singapore. 2013.Yong Ding Li, Lim Kim Chuah and Lee Tiah Khee.

Singapore Bird Report – November 2014

Yellow-eared Spiderhunter FY

A very rare resident Yellow-eared Spiderhunter at Dillenia Hut by Francis Yap.

The Central Catchment Forest was the center of attention this November with the appearance of  four mega rare resident species. The Yellow-eared Spiderhunter was spotted (FY) feeding on a flowering Eugenia tree near the Dillenia Hut on 20th. It was last seen 8 years ago at Rifle Range Link (YDL). Two days later two rare flowerpeckers, the Thick-billed and the Yellow-vented followed the spiderhunter out to check on a flowers on 22nd (DL,LJS,TKH). It was good to know that they are still around in our central forests besides Bukit Timah NR. Even the rarely seen Lesser Green Leafbird was attracted by the flowers. It came out on the 23rd together with the larger Greater Green Leafbird giving us (LKS, LKK, AOY) a few brief views.

Thick-billed FP See Toh

Another rare resident the Thick-billed Flowerpecker at Dillenia Hut by See Toh Yew Wai.

Elsewhere there were many notable sightings include a Gull video swimming at the main pond at SBWR on 7th (LeC). Unfortunately it was too far away for a proper id. An irruption of over 200 Ashy or Cinereous Bulbul was seen over at Chek Java on 4th (LKK,WT). We are still looking for answers as to where they come from. They were later reported all over the island throughout the month. The first Common Kestrel was seen over Tuas South on 1st (LC) with more sightings in the following days. A Greater Spotted Eagle over at Tuas on 13th (AOY) was the third sighting of the year. The Japonensis Peregrine Falcon returned to the CDB on14th (LEL) after a year of absence.  A very rare non-breeding visitor the Streaked Bulbul was seen feeding with the Ashy Bulbuls at Canterbury Road on 13th (LKK). Two days later another two were photographed at Tuas South Ave16 bush (FY) and another on 23rd at the same area (LJS). The rare Japanese Paradise Flycatcher passed through at Bida on 28th (FY,STYW). A surprise Green Broadbill was seen feeding at East Coast Park on 27th (STYW) and 28th. This former resident is now extinct. The Records Committee will have to deliberate on its status.  And right up to the last day, an Oriental Darter was seen at the Ketam Quarry, Ubin (AL). Will this find help to determine the status of one seen in August at the Seng Chew Quarry?

Green-backed FC Alan Ng

Rare migrant Green-backed Flycatcher, male, at Bidadari by Alan Ng.

Bidadari remains the top spot for incoming migrants while we had some surprises from Tuas South.

First the migrants at Bidadari. A juvenile Oriental Cuckoo seen on the first two days of the month (AL) could very well be the same cuckoo reported last month. A passing Black-backed Kingfisher was a good find on 1st (BQ) followed by a late Dark-sided Flycatcher on the 2nd (AR) and 20th (KLH). An early Hodgson’s Hawk Cuckoo was photographed on the 8th (AR). This was followed by another Hodgson’s at SBWR on the 15th (LKK).  The Hodgson’s Hawk Cuckoos are normally seen towards the end of November. Female Mugimaki Flycatchers made their land fall on the 12th (FY) followed by a few males later on. They were still around at the end of the month. The long awaited Hooded Pitta appeared on 24th (LKK). An Eye-browed Thrush on 27th (LKS) was the first for the season while a male Green-backed Flycatcher was seen on the same day (AN). A skittish uncommon Malayan Night Heron was reported on 28th (STWY), rounding off with a Eastern Crown Warbler on 30th (KLH)

Streaked Bulbul See Toh

A very rare non-breeding visitor Streaked Bulbul at Tuas South by See Toh Yew Wai.

Over the skies at Tuas South we had a few surprises. A Brown Hawk Owl was photographed flying over on 1st (LCH). Could this be the northern migrant race of Boobook that is not on our Checklist. A Eurasian Curlew on 7th (TGC), a Black-capped Kingfisher on 9th (STYW) and flocks of Oriental Pratincoles were still coming in with 12 on 13th (AOY) and 73 counted on 15th (LCH). Three Little Ringed Plovers flying pass on 16th (STYW). A single Black Drongo at Tuas Avenue 9 on 20th (RA). The bush in the middle of the open field at Tuas South seems to be the preferred land fall for the passerine migrants with at least two Malayan Night Herons seen on 21st (FY) and 28th (LCH). A juvenile Hodgson’s Hawk Cuckoo on 22nd (LKS, AOY). STYW photographed his Streak Bulbul here on the 23rd after being alerted by LJS.

Reports from other parts of the island include a warbler was mist-netted at the Ecolink on 8th by NParks team (CYF, DT) and appeared to be the Sakhalin Leaf Warbler. Blood samples are being analysed.  Flocks of migrating Fork-tailed or Pacific Swifts were seen all over the island,  40 over Kent Ridge Park feeding on flying termites on 4th (AOY), 50+ thermaling over Telok Blangah Hill on the 9th (AOY). A juvenile Rosy Starling was seen together with the Glossy Starlings at Kent Ridge Park on 10th (FY).  It stayed for a few days. A first winter male Blue and White Flycatcher was reported at Tampines Eco Park on 11th (JA) and later a female on 21st (SA). The White Wagtails of both Leucopsis and Ocularis races were seen at Seletar Dam on 14th (GP). A Green-backed Flycatcher was photographed at Bishan Park on 23rd related by YDL.  The Reed Warblers are back with the Black-browed  seen at Bishan Park on 23rd (JL) and the Pallas’s Grasshopper Warbler at Sengkang Wetlands on 27th (AC). A first of the season Black Bittern was seen at Bishan Park on 27th (LKS).

Pomarine Jaeger FY

Probable rare Pomarine Jaeger at the Straits of Singapore by Francis Yap.

The only pelagic trip to the Straits of Singapore on the 23rd was organised by STYW and the lucky day trippers photographed a probable rare Pomarine Jaeger and a Common Tern besides the usual Swift and Lesser Crested Terns.

The casualties continued to mount as expected. A Lanceolated Warbler crashed into a window at Sengkang Square on 9th, recovered after resting, but was eaten by a House Crow much to DT dismay. A Yellow-rumped Flycatcher, first winter male found dead at Jervios Hill on 14th.  A Black Bittern found dead at Jurong West on 16th and a dead Cinnamon Bittern, probably a migrant at NTU Building the next day. The globally threatened Brown-chested Flycatcher was also a casualty crashing into a flat at Woodlands Ave 8 on the 26th (KK). Meanwhile over at Jurong Island, LKC nursed back to health a Blue-winged Pitta that crashed into his office on 22nd but was not able to save a Hooded Pitta that was found dead on 24th.

A comprehensive Raptor Report for November will be published by Tan Gim Cheong at a coming date.

Reference: The Avifauna of Singapore Lim Kim Seng 2009.  Edited by Francis Yap. Bird crashed records are from David Tan. All other records were taken from postings in the various facebook, bird forums and individual facebook pages belonging to Francis Yap (FY), Seng Alvin (SA), Rey Aguila (RA), See Toh Yew Wai (STYW), Lim Kim Seng (LKS), Lim Kim Keang (LKK), Wellington Tan (WT), Lau Jiasheng (LJS), Lawrence Cher (LC), Lena Chow (LeC), Ben Quek (BQ), Low Choon How (LCH), Aldwin Recinto  (AR), Tan Gim Cheong (TGC), Chung Yi Fei (CYF), David Tan (DT), Danny Lau (DL), Tan Kok Hui (TKH), Janice Ang (JA), Koh Lian Heng (KLH),  George Persanis (GP), Jimmy Lee (JL), Kennneth Kee (KK) and Alan OwYong. Many thanks for your records..