Tag Archives: Kentish Plover

Personal Observations of the Plovers at Marina East Drive.

By Dr. Pary Sivaraman.

These are my own personal observations on the 17th and 18th January 2018 at Marina East Drive. Similar observations on both dates and I was the only birder on both dates.

There was a group of about 10 to 12 Swinhoe’s or White faced Plovers, ssp. dealbatus. Some were in breeding plumage. Just beside them but as a separate group there were about 15 to 16 Kentish Plovers, Charadrius alexandrinus. Some were in breeding plumage. On the first date, the Kentish Plovers were closer to me. On the second date the White faced Plovers were closer to me.

0I0A2862

Kentish Plover in breeding plumage.

The groups tolerated a certain distance between me and them.
When I moved closer they would start walking a few feet.
If I continued, they would fly but interestingly the group closer to me would fly off first.
On the first date, the Kentish Plovers flew off first but the White faced Plovers moved a couple steps further from me and stayed.

On the second date, the White faced Plovers behaved similarly. They were closer and flew off first. The Kentish Plovers didn’t fly off but moved a couple of steps further from me and stayed.

0I0A3144

Swinhoe’s or White-faced Plover in breeding plumage.

I thought it was interesting since the White faced Plovers or Kentish Plovers seemed to stick together as a group. I must emphasize I didn’t move too quickly to them. I presume if I did all of them would have flown away.

I have attached the photos of the Kentish and White faced Plovers in breeding plumage.
I have taken more photos for my own understanding how the birds.

Identifying the Smaller Charadrius Plovers.

Compiled by Alan OwYong and Yong Ding Li.

2016-03-05 18.36.48

Granite seawall next to the Marina Barrage where the plovers are spending the winter.

We were fortunate that Loke Peng Fai found some Kentish, Charadrius alexandrinusand Malaysian Plovers, Charadrius peronii, at the granite embankment next to the Marina Barrage on 24 Oct 2015 now that the access to Changi Cove was restricted. Not only that, a distinctive subspecies of the Kentish Plover were also spending the winter there together with a few Lesser Sand Plovers, Charadrius mongolus,. These are the Swinhoe’s or White-faced Plovers (ssp. dealbatus). This gives us an great opportunity to study them in different plumages close up as they can be rather difficult to identify as a result of their superficially similar plumage patterns.

Let’s start with our resident Malaysian Plovers first.

Malaysian Plovers are more sandy in appearance, and show more mottling on the upperpart. They also have paler legs and more extensive breast band. Both male and female have a white collar. The male has a black breast band while the female has a rufous band both extending over the neck. (Male left, Female right)

 

The Kentish Plovers also have the same white collars as the Malaysian. But they are duller brown with plainer and more uniform upperparts. The legs are darker and the breast band is also less extensive than that of the Malaysian Plover. Unlike the Malaysia Plover, the black breast band of the male does not extend fully around the neck.(Male left, Female right).

White-faced Plover

White-faced or Swinhoe’s Plover (spp. dealbatus)

The Swinhoe’s or White-faced Plovers is a rather distinct looking subspecies (ssp. dealbatus) of the Kentish Plover. It has a similar white collar and uniformly brown upperparts as the Kentish. But the breast band is often hardly noticeable and the broader white lores and brow gives it a white looking face.

Kentish and Lesser Plovers

Kentish and Lesser Plovers

The Lesser Sand Plover (behind) is 2 cm larger than the Kentish ( front) as can be seen from this photo. The key difference is the lack of a white collar for the Lesser Sand Plovers.

Kentish Plover Juvenile

Which Plover is this?

Now that you are clear about the different features of the four small plovers, can you tell which plover is this? Better still can you tell the sex and age as well?

Reference: A field Guide to the Waterbirds of Asia. Wild Birds Society of Japan 1993.

Further reading on the spp dealbatus. “The Rediscovery of a Long-lost Charadrius Plover from South East Asia. Peter Kennerly, Dave Bakewell and Philip Round” at http://www.thaibirding.com/ornithology/lostplover.htm