Singapore Bird Report-August 2016

The Autumn migration is well underway this month with the arrival of the shorebirds early in the month followed by a flood of passerine migrants on the very last day. The wader stops are at Seletar Dam, Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve (SBWR), Kranji Marshes and Pulau Tekong. The star was the globally endangered Great Knot, Calidris tenuirostris, arriving on 13th and staying around the Seletar Dam for a few days.

Great Knot FYap

The Wader of the Month is this Great Knot in partial breeding plumage taken at Seletar Dam by Francis Yap. It had been recently upgraded to globally endangered due to the loss of refueling wetlands at East Asia. 

The newly reclaimed land off Pulau Tekong is turning into a preferred stop for many of the waders. Four globally threatened Chinese Egrets, Egretta eulophotes, on 6th and an Eurasian Curlew, Numenius arquata, on 5th were recorded there. A big thank you to Frankie Cheong for monitoring this restricted location where he also found a family of 2 Malaysian Plovers, Charadrius peronii, adults with two chicks there on the 13th.

frankie-cheongThe newly reclaimed land at Pulau Tekong getting its fair share of rare waders this season. The Asian Dowitcher was the first record here. Three Grey Plovers in breeding plumage and a Greater Sand Plover are next to the Dowitcher. Photo: Frankie Cheong. 

IMG-20160827-WA0006

An unmistakable Ruddy Turnstone in breeding plumage arrived at P. Tekong on the 27th. Thanks again to Frankie Cheong for getting this on record.

Parts of the construction site next to Kranji Marshes were flooded and shallow pools of fresh water attracted many of the waders that were looking for water fleas and larvae there. 13 Long-toed Stints, Calidris subminuta, (Alan OwYong) were counted on 31st. This is a high number for this uncommon plover as past records were in the single numbers.  Also present were at least two Wood Sandpipers, Tringa glareola, and up to 13 Little-ringed Plovers, Charadrius dubius, (Martin Kennewell).

Eurasian Curlew Millie Cher

These two juvenile Eurasian Curlews arrived at SBWR on 25th. The first arrival was recorded at P. Tekong on the 5th by Frankie Cheong. Photo: Millie Cher.

Here is the list of some of the first arrivals.

Species Date Location Observer/s Remarks
Wood Sandpiper x 2 3rd Kranji Marshes Martin Kennewell First reported on 31/8
Common Redshank x 30 5th SBWR Lim Kim Seng
Eurasian Curlew 5th P. Tekong Frankie Cheong. Two birds reported at SBWR by David Li on 25th
Chinese Egret x 4 6th P. Tekong Frankie Cheong
Black-tailed Godwit 7th SBWR Adrian Gopal One reported on 13th at Seletar Dam by Francis Yap.
Pacific Golden Plover 9th Seletar Dam Francis Yap Most in breeding plumage.
Great Knot 13th Seletar Dam Francis Yap Partial breeding plumage.
Greater Sand Plover 18th Seletar Dam KC Ling, Timothy Chua Timothy Chua. Another reported at Seletar Dam on 31st.
Terek Sandpiper 19th Seletar Dam Zacc HD Another seen at P. Tekong on 27th by Frankie Cheong.
Marsh Sandpiper 19th SBWR David Li
Common Greenshank 19th SBWR David Li
Asian Dowitcher 20th SBWR Keita Sin With a Black-tailed Godwit.
Intermediate Egret 23rd SBWR Veronica Foo
Ruddy Turnstone 27th P. Tekong Frankie Cheong One bird in breeding plumage.
Little-ringed Plover x 7 27th Kranji Marshes Martin Kennewell Numbers increased to 13 on  30th by Martin Kennewell
Long-toed Stint x 2 27th Kranji Marshes Martin Kennewell Numbers increased to 13 on 31st by Alan OwYong
White-winged Tern 27th SBWR Martin Kennewell
Grey Plovers x 12-15 31st P. Tekong Frankie Cheong All in breeding plumage together with an Asian Dowitcher.

 

GSP FYap

The Greater Sand Plover taken at Seletar Dam on 22nd by Francis Yap showing all the identification features.

Then on the last day of the month, we had a furry of passerine making their first landfall here. Forest Wagtail, Dendronanthus indicus, at Dillenia Hut from Francis Yap, a male Yellow-rumped Flycatcher, Ficedula zanthopygia, at Venus Loop from Goh Juan Hui and a Common Kingfisher, Alcedo atthis, at the Gardens by the Bay from Danny Khoo. Earlier in the month an Asian Brown Flycatcher,  Muscicapa latirostris, was photographed at the Japanese Gardens by Kristie Yeong on 20th, four Daurian Starlings, Agropsar sturninus, were seen flying around at Seletar Dam on 21st by Keita Sin. We can expect to see more of these song birds at our forests and woodlands next month.

Yellow-rumped FC Juan Hui

Our first Ficedula for the season, a Yellow-rumped Flycatcher at Venus Loop on the last day of the month. Photo: Juan Hui Goh.

Also on the 31st, two non breeding visiting bulbuls were reported at P. Ubin by Lim Kim Keang and Willie Foo. The uncommon Streaked, Ixos malaccensis, and Cinereous Bulbuls, Hemixos cinereus. A rare winter visitor was the Brown-streaked Flycatcher, Muscicapa williamsoni, reported at SBWR on 9th by Kingsley Phang.

Tan Gim Cheong was surprised by a Ruddy Kingfisher, Halcyon coromanda, flying across his path at Kelicap Hut, P. Ubin on 11th. This is our rare resident race, H. cminor, that had only been recorded in P. Tekong and Ayer Merbau groups of islands. This is the first record for Ubin confirming some local dispersal. We received an unconfirmed record of three male Cotton Pygmy Goose, Nettapus coromandelianus, a rare resident, flying over Cove Village at Sentosa from Esther, a resident there. I was not able to get more details on this sighting.

Other resident records were easier to confirm like the male Violet Cuckoo, Chrysococcyx xanthorhynchus, over at Jelutong on 5th by Francis Yap. As usual he got some great shots of this uncommon cuckoo. A Little Spiderhunter, Arachnothera longirostris, was also photographed at Venus Drive by KC Ling, and a report of the Spotted Wood Owl, Strix seloputo at West Coast Park by Keita Sin, both on the 5th.  Jansen Seah came in with a report of a pair of Greater Green Leafbirds, Chloropsis sonnerati, chasing away other birds at Upper Thompson Road. Frankie Cheong showed us a photo of a dark morph Pacific Reef Heron, Egretta sacra, again at his backyard at Tekong on 6th. This Egret made its appearance at SBWR on 27th at the Striated Heron Island at the main pond (Daniel Ong and Francis Yap).

pacific-reef-heron-see-tohPacific Reef Heron paid a visit to Sungei Buloh and stayed for a few days. Photo: See Toh Yew Wai. 

Geoff Lim chanced on a Buffy Fish Owl, Ketupa ketupa, at Lower Peirce Boardwalk on 6th.  It was seen again on the 26th by Thio Hb. This was one of the most reliable locations to see this uncommon owl before they spread out. The newly fledged Buffy Fish Owl at SBWR made an appearance at the reserves on 21st spotted by Wing Chong. Great to know that it is doing well.

p8210891Sungie Buloh’s Buffy Fish Owl Jr. can now hunt for itself. Seen here finishing its catch. Alan OwYong

Zacc was really happy to get the House Swift, Apus nipalensis, on his sensors at Punggol Barat on 9th. This resident swift is getting rare nowadays. Aldwin Recinto photographed a Greater Coucal, Centropus sinensis, a forest specific, at Pasir Ris Park on 20th, most likely a dispersal from  across P. Ubin.

Greater Coucal at PRP Aldwin

Greater Coucal a forest species photographed at Pasir Ris Park by Aldwin Recinto.

The resident ernesti race Peregrine Falcon, Falco peregrinus, was seen flying over Punggol Barat on 31st by Lawrence Cher. Tan Gim Cheong will have the rest of the raptor records in this coming Raptor Report.

Some notable records from eBird for August: Amur Paradise Flycatcher, Terpsiphone paradisi, at BTNR on 9th and an Asian Palm Swift, Cypsiurus balasiensis, at Coney Island on 12th both by Christopher Gainey. A Greater Sand Plover, Charadrius leschenaultii, at Marina Barrage on 16th by Malcolm Graham. A Brown Boobook, Ninox scutulata was seen at 7 pm on 23rd along the MacRitchie Boardwalk by Marcel Finley.

Reference:

Lim Kim Seng. The Avifauna of Singapore. 2009 Nature Society (Singapore). 

Yong Ding Li, Lim Kim Chuah and Lee Tiah Khee. A Naturalist’s Guide to the Birds of Singapore. 2013. John Beaufoy Publishing Limited. 

Craig Robson. A field Guide to the Birds of Thailand and South East Asia. 2000.

This report is compiled by Alan OwYong and edited by Tan Gim Cheong from selected postings in various facebook birding pages, bird forums and individual reports. Some were not verified. We wish to thank all the  contributors for their records. Many thanks to Francis Yap, Millie Cher, See Toh Yew Wai, Frankie Cheong, Aldwin Recinto, Goh Juan Hui and Alan OwYong, for the use of their photos.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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3 thoughts on “Singapore Bird Report-August 2016

  1. marcel finlay

    Hi Alan

    thanks for the August report – it seems to have been a great month – unfortunately I missed most of it away in the UK.

    It is good to see that you are picking up some of the sightings posted on ebird – it’s a great tool and brilliant for sharing – it would be even better if more birders in Singapore started to contribute.

    I notice that you mentioned my sighting of the Brown Boobook in Macritchie (on the Petai Trail) – I am aware that it is Ninox Scutulata – I have had the pleasure of seeing them in the same location for many years. ebird calls what we know as the Brown Hawk Owl the Brown Boobook, it calls Ninox Japonica the Northern Boobook (like the possible one at Pasir Ris Park earlier this year).

    It is great to see the migrants arrive. I have seen Tiger Shrikes in three different locations this Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday (I got a nice recording at Gardens by the Bay yesterday morning – you can hear it on bird), and saw a female Green-backed Flycatcher and an Indian Cuckoo at Bidadari on Tuesday evening – unfortunately no camera with me. I managed to catch up with the cuckoo again this morning (I have put some photos on ebird) but couldn’t find the flycatcher again.

    I’m off to australia for the next 10 days – I hope I don’t miss too much!

    all the best

    marcel

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    1. Alan OwYong Post author

      Dear Marcel, Thank you for the clarifications. We only added the Northern Boobook to our CL last year after DNA sequencing from a dead specimen. So we now have the resident Brown Hawk Owl and the migrant Northern Boobook in our official CL. Where can I find the ebird CL? The monthly report is compiled from postings in the various facebook postings where we can verify the id from the photos. Still it is only as good as the records posted. Have a good trip to Australia and thanks for the records.

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  2. Pingback: Back from the breeding grounds | flightpathproject

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